It’s a historic day in Canada with recreational cannabis being legal tomorrow (Wed).

In B.C., laws have been put in place that are aimed at the health and safety of the population.

Non-medical cannabis consumption is generally not allowed in vehicles whether they are parked or moving, but there are some exceptions to the rule.

It can be used in motorhomes or other motor vehicles, or campers, or trailers when they are being used as a private home and parked off a public road or forest service road where camping is allowed.

Like alcohol, cannabis can be transported in a vehicle as long as it’s in its original, unopened packaging, or is inaccessible to the driver and occupants, like in the trunk.

Four non-medical cannabis plants can be transported in a vehicle, but they cannot be budding or flowering.

Non-medical cannabis use is generally not allowed on boats unless the boat is moored or anchored, has sleeping accommodations, a kitchen, and a toilet.

British Columbians, 19 years old and older, throughout the province will be able to legally purchase non-medical cannabis online from bccannabisstores.com.

The Liquor Distribution Branch has a contract in place with Canada Post to deliver online cannabis orders to customers.

Canada Post will do age-verification checks and in the event that a customer appears to be under the age of 25, the product will be returned to the Liquor Distribution Branch and the full purchase price and taxes will be refunded.

It will cost 10 dollars to ship from the online store and the Branch says orders will leave the distribution centre bound for customers without 48 business hours.

The first BC Cannabis Store, in Kamloops, is set to open tomorrow morning (Wed) at 10.

The store will feature about 85 dried-flower strains of cannabis plus a selection of oils, capsules, and pre-rolls approved by Health Canada.

Island Health has done some homework leading up to the legalization of cannabis.

An Island Medical Health Officer said most communities have bylaws in place that will allow for the consumption of cannabis in the same places where cigarette smoking is allowed.

Dr. Shannon Waters said Island Health has urged communities to ensure retail cannabis outlets are located away from schools.

Parents, she said, should listen carefully to what their children are saying.

“Keeping the threads of communication open, trying to have as little judgment as possible. Youth today are going to be in a different environment than any parent has been. They are in an environment where cannabis is legalized and that’s going to change the dialogue, what people see in the course of a day in terms of cannabis use.”

Waters said teenagers have developing brains and should delay experimenting with cannabis as long as possible.

She said Island Health is expecting more emergency room visits as a result of exposure to cannabis and she says the older generation, those over 65 who tried cannabis as a teenager, should note that today’s weed is a lot different than it was half a century ago.

“Individuals over that age range may have used cannabis early on in their life, the products that are out there are different now and many times stronger so it can have more effect. So, definitely use caution and be careful and just know that this is not necessarily not something that you take a certain amount and have a certain effect.”