With the pandemic continuing in British Columbia, and all over the world, many are turning to nature as a source of relief.

A new Ipsos poll, conducted for the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC), reveals that 94 percent of people credit time spent in nature with helping them relieve the stress and anxiety of the pandemic’s second wave. 

The trend is especially prevalent among women and young families. 

More than 85 per cent of people surveyed say access to nature has been important to maintaining their mental health and three in four Canadians say time spent outdoors is more important to them now than ever before.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada says from backyard birds and pollinators, to increased use of trails and parks, anecdotally, Canadians report a greater awareness of nature in their lives since the pandemic began. 

The NCC explains that as a result, nine in ten people surveyed say we need to invest more to restore and care for the natural areas that sustain us all.

Some of that help comes in the form of donations, through the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Landmark Campaign, which has made a big difference in British Columbia. 

“In British Columbia, we have been really encouraged by the enthusiasm and commitment shown by our donors and partners throughout the Landmark Campaign,” explains regional board chair Janice Wattis

“This support has enabled some truly remarkable conservation achievements across the province. Today, thanks to our donors, there are more forests, more estuaries, more grasslands and more wetlands that will continue to flourish and provide all the immeasurable benefits that nature offers, for wildlife and for people,” she adds. 

To learn more, visit the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s website.