B.C.’s COVID-19 curve is ever-so-slowly bending down.

Hospitalizations are at their lowest point since mid-April, and the province’s seven-day rolling average is 695 cases, the lowest number since March 25th.

All this is encouraging news for provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry.

“It shows that what we are doing here in B.C. right now is working, to prevent transmission, and to save lives,” Dr. Henry said. “By continuing to follow all of our safety basics and for all of us to get our vaccine as soon as we are eligible, we will be one step closer to where COVID will no longer be disrupting our lives.” 

As well, sometime today, B.C.’s two millionth dose of COVID-19 vaccine is expected to be administered.

However, the province did record its first case of a rare blood clot disorder after a patient received the AstraZeneca vaccine.

A woman in her 40s is now being treated in hospital in the Vancouver Coastal Health region.

“This is something that we know is rare, but is associated with the AstraZeneca vaccines that we have been receiving here in Canada,” Dr. Henry said.

She said the likelihood of this happening is roughly one in 100,000 doses.

Dr. Henry said that while rare, the potential for this blood clot to develop is between four and 28 days after receiving a vaccine.

Dr. Henry added that AstraZeneca is an important part of B.C.’s vaccination program and is reassuring people that it’s safe.

“This is an excellent vaccine,” she said. “It is safe, and it is effective, and we only need to look at places like the U.K. to see how effective it is in preventing transmission, making sure that you are protected yourself, but also protecting your family and those that you’re closest to.”

She said that some of her family and friends have received the AstraZeneca vaccine “along with millions of others around the world, and I am confident that they have done the right thing to protect themselves and our community.”

During today’s update, the province reported 694 new cases, which is 122 more than yesterday.

Of those, 17 were on Vancouver Island and 153 were in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, which includes the Sunshine Coast.